How to Select Courses

The modern K-12 grade level system never existed in world history before the public schools were created in the 1850s.

Take a minute and read that a few times.

None of the wise men or saints you can name from history studied in the system of K-12 grade levels that Catholics are putting their children through in this generation.  I don’t think we’re making good decisions.  The classical Catholic curriculum does not fit into this K-12 system, and Catholic schools and parents must not allow the K-12 system to control their ideas, because this will lead to many bad decisions in education.  Catholics should learn to think of education as Catholics did before the public school system was created 150 years ago–so that they may rightly understand the subjects and courses and how they relate to the pursuit of true Wisdom.

Understanding that all schools and parents looking at the Classical Liberal Arts Academy curriculum will do so with this K-12 model in mind, we offer the following course recommendations based on that model.  This should not be interpretated as an approval of that model, but only as a help to those learning about true classical Catholic education.  Remember, these divisions are completely artificial and should not be treated as if they are real, natural divisions for individual students.

I.  Early Elementary (Level 000 Courses)

The goal of the early elementary years is for children to learn to study independently, that they may begin classical studies in the upper elementary years.  This requires that students learn to read, write, type, memorize Arithmetic facts, develop routines of prayer and study, etc.

Pre-K/K (Ages 3-6)

  1. Petty School Reading
  2. Petty School Writing
  3. Petty School Arithmetic
  4. Petty School Bible
  5. Petty School Catechism

Grade 1 (Ages 6-7)

  1. English Reading
  2. Handwriting
  3. Latin Vocabulary
  4. Modern Arithmetic I
  5. Aesop’s Fables (Reading)
  6. Baltimore Catechism
  7. Catholic Bible

Grade 2 (Ages 7-8)

  1. English Reading
  2. Handwriting
  3. Latin Vocabulary
  4. Modern Arithmetic I
  5. Aesop’s Fables (Reading)
  6. Baltimore Catechism
  7. Catholic Bible

II.  Upper Elementary (Level 100 Courses)

At the upper elementary level, students move into true classical studies, getting started with classical Grammar, Latin reading, etc.

Grade 3 (Ages 8-9)

  1. Latin Reading
  2. Latin Vocabulary
  3. Modern Arithmetic II
  4. Aesop’s Fables
  5. Baltimore Catechism
  6. Daily Scripture Reading
  7. World Chronology

Grade 4 (Ages 9-10)

  1. Classical Grammar
  2. Latin Reading
  3. Latin Vocabulary
  4. Modern Arithmetic II
  5. Aesop’s Fables
  6. Pliny, Natural History
  7. Baltimore Catechism
  8. Daily Scripture Reading
  9. World Chronology

Grade 5 (Ages 10-11)

  1. Classical Grammar
  2. Latin Reading
  3. Classical Vocabulary
  4. Modern Arithmetic III
  5. Aesop’s Fables
  6. Pliny, Natural History
  7. Baltimore Catechism
  8. Daily Scripture Reading
  9. World Chronology

III.  Middle School  (200 Level Courses)

In the middle school years, students should be progressing in classical studies and finishing modern Arithmetic studies, putting them in prime position for the greatest possible achievement in the high school years.

Grade 6 (Ages 11-12)

  1. Latin Grammar
  2. Latin Reading
  3. Classical Vocabulary
  4. Modern Arithmetic III
  5. Aesop’s Fables
  6. Pliny, Natural History
  7. Baltimore Catechism
  8. Daily Scripture Reading
  9. World Chronology
  10. Drawing
  11. Music

Grade 7 (Ages 12-13)

  1. Latin Grammar
  2. Latin Reading
  3. Greek Grammar
  4. Modern Arithmetic III
  5. Aesop’s Fables
  6. Pliny, Natural History
  7. Baltimore Catechism
  8. Sacred Scripture
  9. World Chronology
  10. Drawing
  11. Music

Grade 8 (Ages 13-14)

  1. Latin Grammar
  2. Latin Reading I
  3. Greek Grammar
  4. Algebra
  5. Theophrastus, Characters
  6. Baltimore Catechism
  7. Sacred Scripture
  8. World Chronology

IV.  High School (300+ Level Courses)

In the high school years, students must immerse themselves in the most rigorous course of studies possible.  For students preparing for admission to selective universities, four years of English, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Natural Science and History are necessary.  Catholic students must complete these studies in the most efficient manner possible, in a program into which classical Catholic studies are integrated.  It is better for Catholic students to continue their classical Catholic studies beyond age 18 and delay college admission, than to go without them into college and career studies.

Grade 9 (Ages 14-15)

  1. English Composition
  2. Latin Grammar
  3. Latin Reading
  4. Classical Reasoning
  5. Algebra
  6. Classical Arithmetic
  7. Classical Ethics
  8. Biology
  9. Sacred Scripture
  10. Baltimore Catechism, or Summa Theologica, or Catholic Catechism
  11. World History
  12. English Literature

Grade 10 (Age 15-16)

  1. English Composition
  2. Latin Grammar
  3. Latin Reading
  4. Classical Reasoning
  5. Modern Geometry
  6. Classical Geometry
  7. Classical Ethics
  8. Physics
  9. Sacred Scripture
  10. Baltimore Catechism, or Summa Theologica, or Catholic Catechism
  11. World History
  12. English Literature

Grade 11 (Ages 16-17)

  1. English Composition
  2. Latin Grammar
  3. Latin Reading
  4. Classical Reasoning
  5. Classical Rhetoric
  6. Algebra II
  7. Classical Geometry
  8. Classical Physics
  9. Chemistry
  10. Sacred Scripture
  11. Baltimore Catechism, or Summa Theologica, or Catholic Catechism
  12. World History
  13. English Literature

Grade 12 (Ages 17-18)

  1. English Composition
  2. Latin Grammar
  3. Latin Reading
  4. Classical Reasoning
  5. Classical Rhetoric
  6. Geometry & Trigonometry
  7. Classical Geometry
  8. Classical Metaphyiscs
  9. Physiology
  10. Sacred Scripture
  11. Baltimore Catechism, or Summa Theologica, or Catholic Catechism
  12. World History
  13. English Literature

High School Transcript

If a student in the Classical Liberal Arts Academy wishes to apply for admission to a college, university, religious community or other institution, we recommend that the classical Catholic curriculum not be communicated simple because it will not be understood outside the CLAA.  We recommend that the student’s academic work be communicated in terms these institutions will understand, using a modern 4-year high school arrangement.