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Introduction to Classical Arithmetic is Now Available

Introduction to Classical Arithmetic is Now Available

by William Michael -
Number of replies: 0

Dear friends,

Modern education directs attention to the study of Mathematics, but does not produce great mathematicians.  This is because students do not learn Mathematics as the great mathematicians of history did in modern Math programs.  How did Descartes, Newton, Leibniz and Euler study Mathematics?  That's a question we should be asking.

While we offer students in the Classical Liberal Arts Academy a set of modern Mathematics courses, these are only intended to help them satisfy modern school requirements while focusing on classical Catholic studies.  They are not intended to lead any students to real mastery in Mathematics.

For students to gain mastery in Mathematics, they need to study the four mathematical arts as they are found in the ancient Quadrivium:  Classical Arithmetic, Classical Music, Classical Geometry and Classical Astronomy.  These courses are the core Mathematics courses in the Classical Liberal Arts Academy.  

At the same time, there is a better way to lead students to mastery of the concepts of modern Arithmetic and Algebra than through modern Math classes or textbooks.  

In 2008, when I opened the Classical Liberal Arts Academy, my "Intro to Classical Arithmetic" course was one of my most popular courses.  Parents and students said that this was the best Math course they'd ever seen--and I agree.  The course is based on a Math textbook published in 1735, which shows us how Arithmetic was studied at the time of the great modern mathematicians.  

What sets this course apart from all others is that students are taught the elements of Arithmetic in a demonstrative way.  That is, they are not merely taught what needs to be known in Arithmetic, but why it is so.  That is, they are taught the true science of Arithmetic.  

I am happy to announce that the Classical Liberal Arts Academy's "Intro to Classical Arithmetic" courses is once again open for study.

Students may enroll and get started immediately.  This is a 200 level course, so it is not intended for students under age 12, and it requires developing comprehension and communication skills.  Lessons are to be studied for mastery and assessed with written comprehension questions.  I strongly encourage parents to enroll  their children in this course and give it priority in their Mathematics education.  You'll see the results.

God bless,

Mr. William C. Michael, Headmaster
Classical Liberal Arts Academy
mail@classicalliberalarts.com