Latin Grammar I, Article 32. Pronomina Composita ex Provocabulo QUIS, cum Sequitur

In lesson 30, we studied the declension of the Latin pronouns. In lessons 31-34, we will study a number of different composite pronouns, built from the simple pronouns studied in lesson 30, whose meaning and declension are important to know for Latin reading and translation. To complete the objectives of this lesson, complete the following tasks:

  1. Read through the lesson from beginning to end.
  2. Study the lesson for mastery, taking notes.
  3. Complete the lesson assessment.

Lesson

In lesson 31, we studied the first of several classes of composite pronouns, that is, pronouns composed of simple pronouns, which begin with the pronoun quis. In this lesson, we will study a second class, which end with the pronoun quis. For each of the composite pronouns below, be sure to learn the meaning of the pronoun and how it is declined. An example from the Latin Vulgate is provided to demonstrate each pronoun’s use.

Aliquis, aliqua, aliquod vel aliquid, alicuius, alicui.

  1. The composite pronoun aliquis is an indefinite pronoun. While quis is translated “Who?” or “What”, aliquis is translated, “anyone” or “anything”.
  2. This composite pronoun is formed by simply adding the prefix “ali-” to the forms of quis. The pronoun is declined by simply adding “ali-” to each of the declined forms of “quis“:

“Non contendet, neque clamabit, neque audiet aliquis in plateis vocem ejus.”
“He shall not contend, nor cry out, neither shall anyone hear his voice in the streets.”

Matthew 12:19

Ecquis, ecqua vel ecquae, ecquod vel ecquid, eccuius, eccui.

  1. The composite pronoun ecquis is an interrogative pronoun composed from the simple pronoun quis. While quis is translated “who” or “what”, ecquis is translated, “anyone?” or “anything?”.
  2. This composite pronoun is formed by simply adding the prefix “ec-” to the forms of quis. The pronoun is declined by simply adding “ec-” to each of the declined forms of “quis“.

Ecquis erit, mecum, iuvenes, qui primus in hostem?”
“Shall anyone be with me, young men? Who (shall be) first against the enemy?”

Aeneid 9.51

Nequis, nequa, nequod vel nequid, necuius, necui.

  1. The composite pronoun nequis is an indefinite pronoun composed from the simple pronoun quis. While quis is translated “who” or “what”, nequis is translated, “no one” or “nothing”.
  2. This composite pronoun is formed by simply adding the prefix “ne-” to the forms of quis. The pronoun is declined by simply adding “ne-” to each of the declined forms of “quis“.

“Et nequis possit emere, aut vendere, nisi qui habet caracterem, aut nomen bestiae, aut numerum nominis ejus.”
“And that no one might buy or sell, but he that hath the character, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.”

Revelation 13:17

Siquis, siqua vel siquae, siquod vel siquid, sicuius, sicui.

  1. The composite pronoun siquis is an indefinite pronoun composed from the simple pronoun quis. While quis is translated “who” or “what”, siquis is translated, “if anyone” or “if anything”.
  2. This composite pronoun is formed by simply adding the prefix “si-” to the forms of quis. The pronoun is declined by simply adding “si-” to each of the declined forms of “quis“.

Quae pecunia mulieri legata erat a filio, siquis natus esset.”
“What money to the woman had been left from (her) child, if anyone should be born.”

Cicero, Pro A. Cluentio 12.34

Numquis, numqua, numquod vel numquid, numcuius, numcui.

  1. The composite pronoun numquis is an indefinite pronoun composed from the simple pronoun quis. While quis is translated “who” or “what”, numquis is translated, “anyone” or “anything”.
  2. This composite pronoun is formed by simply adding the prefix “num-” to the forms of quis. The pronoun is declined by simply adding “num-” to each of the declined forms of “quis“.

Numquis hic est? nemo est: numquis hinc me sequitur? nemo homo est.
“Is anyone here? No one is: Anyone here me did follow? There is no man.”

Terence, Eunuchs 3.5

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