Latin Grammar I, Lesson 22. Irregular Nouns

In lessons 10-21, we have studied the declension of regular Latin nouns. In lesson 22, we begin the study of irregular nouns. We will quickly move through lessons 22-26 before beginning the declension of adjective nouns in lesson 27. Let us learn the rule given in article 22: 22. Anomala sive inaequalia vocantur quae aut numero aut genere aut declinatione aut casu aut aliquo alio attributo deficiunt. This rule translates as follows: “(Nouns) irregular or inequal are called, which either in number or in gender, or in declension or in case or in some other attribute are deficient.” In lesson … Continue

Latin Reading I, Lesson 26. John 4:16-20

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To complete this lesson, complete the following tasks: 1. Study the lesson below, carefully and completely.2. Read the instructions for translation exercises.3. Complete translation exercises.4. Memorize all lesson vocabulary.5. Work to earn a perfect score on your lesson exam. Lesson 21 Dicit ei Jesus: “Mulier, crede mihi, quia venit hora, quando neque in monte hoc, neque in Jerosolymis adorabitis Patrem. 22 Vos adoratis quod nescitis: nos adoramus quod scimus, quia salus ex Judaeis est. 23 Sed venit hora, et nunc est, quando veri adoratores adorabunt Patrem in spiritu et veritate. Nam et Pater tales quaerit, qui adorent eum. 24 Spiritus est … Continue

The World Needs Classicists!

When a student sees a lesson in the Classical Liberal Arts Academy, they usually see a nice, clean lesson in a modern format, or a carefully chosen book in English translation. That is the end result of the work of the Classical Liberal Arts Academy’s mission of researching, restoring, publishing and teaching the classical liberal arts. Thirteen years, before the CLAA started, these studies were nowhere to be found. They are not taught in modern colleges or universities, and certainly not in an schools or homeschool programs. Today, they are available to students around the world (for free!) and, to … Continue

Latin Grammar I, Lesson 21.

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In this lesson, we study chapter 21 of Book I of the Latin Grammar of Emmanuel Alvarez. This is a translation of chapter 21 of Book I of the Latin Grammar of Rev. Emmanuel Alvarez, S.J., by William C. Michael l. Genitivus pluralis declinationis primae, secundae ac tertiae interdum, praesertim a poetis, minuitur, quam imminutionem Graeci “syncopen” vocant. The Genitive plural of the declension first, second and third sometimes, especially by (the) poets, is abbreviated, which abbreviation (the) Greeks “Syncope” call. The topic of this lesson is simply the use of syncope, or “abbreviation”, in Latin, where the normal plural … Continue

Latin Grammar I, Lesson 06. Of Positive, Comparative and Superlative Nouns

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In this lesson, we study chapter 6 of Book I of the Latin Grammar of Emmanuel Alvarez. This is a translation of chapter 6 of Book I of the Latin Grammar of Rev. Emmanuel Alvarez, S.J., by William C. Michael I. Nomen positivum sive absolutum est quod rem absolute simpliciterque significat, ut magnus. parvus. I. A positive (or absolute) noun is that which a thing absolutely and simply signifie, as magnus (great), parvus (small). II. Comparativum est quod rem vel attollit vel deprimit, ut major, minor. II. A comparative noun is that which a thing either lifts up or sets … Continue

Latin Grammar I, Lesson 05. Various Classes of Adjectives

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This is a translation of chapter 5 of Book I of the Latin Grammar of Rev. Emmanuel Alvarez, S.J., by William C. Michael In the last lesson, we learned that Nouns can be divided into Substantives and Adjectives. In this lesson, we look at the different classes of Adjective nouns. This is a long and important lesson that you should study carefully and use as a reference. 1. Interrogativum nomen est quo de re aliqua quaerimus, ut Quis? Uter? Quantus?, etc.. An Interrogative Noun is that by which we ask about some other things, as “Who?”, “Which?”, “How much?”, etc. … Continue

Latin Grammar I, Lesson 05. Of Nouns

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1. Nomen est pars orationis, quae casus habet neque tempora adsignificat, ut musa, dominum. A Noun is a part of speech, which has case and does not signify time, as musa (a muse), dominus (a master). The first of the parts of speech we will learn of is the Noun. In modern Grammar books, we may be taught that a noun is a “person, place or thing”, but that is not a true definition. We see two characteristics identified in this definition–one positive and one negative. Positively, a noun has cases. That distinguished a noun from the four undeclined parts … Continue

Latin Grammar I, Lesson 03. The Accidents

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Return to Study Center Introduction In the previous lesson, we learned the names of the eight parts of speech. We learned that four of them are declined, and four of them are free of declined. In this lesson, we will study to become familiar with the “accidents” of the parts of speech. We’ll learn what this word “accidents” means in a moment. This lesson is part of the Classical Liberal Arts Academy’s Latin Grammar I course. Enroll now! Lesson The lesson begins with an introduction: 12. Sunt quaedam quae partes orationis comitantur, ut: Numerus, Casus, Genus, Declinatio et Conjugatio, Modus, … Continue

Latin Grammar I, Lesson 02. The Parts of Speech

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Return to Study Center Introduction In our first lesson, we studied the letters and sounds of the Latin language. At the end of that lesson, we learned that letters are used to make syllables, syllables are used to make words, and words are used to make sentences, or speech (oratio). Words are the “parts of speech”, and to make sentences, we must learn how to use words correctly. We study this in “Etymology”, which is the second part of Grammar. Unfortunately, there are thousands of words, and this is no easy task. Thankfully, though there are thousands of words, they … Continue

Latin Grammar I, Lesson 01. Letters

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A lesson tutorial video has been provided for this lesson. A free version (with ads) is available on the Academy’s YouTube channel, but Student/Family Plan subscribers can access an ad-free version on the CLAA Study Center. Welcome to Latin Grammar I. The text we will be studying in this course is the Latin Grammar of the 16th century Jesuit schoolmaster Rev. Emmanuel Alvarez; a text that was studied by Catholics for several centuries. In this course, we will study the first two parts of Latin Grammar: Orthography and Etymology. Orthography is the study of the letters and sounds of the … Continue