The Wolf and the Lamb, by Aesop

In this lesson, we study Aesop’s Fable of “The Wolf and the Lamb”. To complete the objectives of this lesson, complete the following tasks: Study the fable for mastery, being careful to learn all of the details of the fable. Study the lesson exposition below. Complete the lesson assessment. Lesson A hungry Wolf one day saw a Lamb drinking at a stream, and wished to frame some plausible excuse for making him his prey. “What do you mean by muddling the water I am going to drink?” fiercely said he to the Lamb. “Pray forgive me,” meekly answered the Lamb; … Continue

The Two Frogs, a Fable by Aesop

In this lesson, we study Aesop’s Fable of “The Two Frogs”. To complete the objectives of this lesson, complete the following tasks: Study the fable for mastery, being careful to learn all of the details of the fable. Study the lesson exposition below. Complete the lesson assessment. Lesson One hot summer, the lake in which two Frogs lived was completely dried up, and they were obliged to set off in search of water elsewhere. Coming to a deep and deliciously cool well, one of the Frogs proposed that they should jump in at once. “Wait a bit.” cried the other; … Continue

The Cock and the Jewel

In this lesson, we study Aesop’s Fable of “The Two Frogs”. To complete the objectives of this lesson, complete the following tasks: Study the fable for mastery, being careful to learn all of the details of the fable. Study the lesson exposition below. Complete the lesson assessment. Lesson A brisk young Cock scratching for something with which to entertain his favorite hens, happened to turn up a jewel. Feeling quite sure that it was something precious, but not knowing well what to do with it, he addressed it with an air of affected wisdom as follows:—” You are a very … Continue

St. Thomas Aquinas on the Office of a Wise Man

In the Classical Liberal Arts Academy, we study to become wise men. In this post, I’d like to share a passage from St. Thomas Aquinas’ famous work, “Summa Contra Gentiles”, in which he discusses the office, or duty, of a wise man. Enjoy. -WCM “My mouth shall meditate truth, and my lips shall hate impiety.” Proverbs 8:7 1. The usage of the multitude, which according to the Philosopher is to be followed in giving names to things, has commonly held that they are to be called wise who order things rightly and govern them well. Hence, among other things that … Continue

Enjoy the Wisdom of Aesop’s Fables

The need for wise moral teaching is more important than ever for our families. We need to be immersed in wholesome moral lessons, which supply with constant content for discussion and meditation. One of the best sources history provides us with is Aesop’s Fables. In the Classical Liberal Arts Academy, we offer students the opportunity to study Aesop’s Fables and provide lesson videos, graded assignments, student records and expert support. A sample lesson is available above. He that walketh with the wise, shall be wise. Proverbs 13:20 Our course on Aesop’s Fables is one of our most popular courses. To … Continue

Seneca, On Firmness of Mind

In this lesson, we continue our study of Stoic Philosophy, reading Seneca’s essay “On Firmness of Mind”. To complete the objectives of this lesson: Study the lesson for mastery. Complete the lesson assessment. Reading I might say with good reason, Serenus, that there is as great a difference between the Stoics and the other schools of philosophy as there is between males and females, since while each set contributes equally to human society, the one class is born to obey, the other to command. Other philosophers, using gentle and persuasive measures, are like the intimate family physician, who, commonly, tries … Continue

The Stag Looking into the Pool

A Stag drinking at a clear pool, admired the handsome look of his spreading antlers, but was much displeased at the slim and ungainly appearance of his legs. “What a glorious pair of branching horns!” said he. “How grace fully they hang over my forehead! What an agreeable air they give my face! But as for my spindle-shanks of legs, I am heartily ashamed of them.” The words were scarcely out of his mouth, when he saw some huntsmen and a pack of hounds making towards him. His despised legs soon placed him at a distance from his followers, but, … Continue

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