Free Book! Porphyry’s Introduction

Purchase a printed copy of Porphyry's Introduction from the CLAA Catalog.

We’re happy to provide Academy students with another newly published book: Porphyry’s Introduction to the Categories of Aristotle. This 3rd century classic is the first book studied in the Classical Liberal Arts Academy’s Classical Reasoning I course. You can download a free copy below, or purchase a printed copy from the Academy bookstore. God bless your studies,Mr. William C. Michael, HeadmasterClassical Liberal Arts Academymail@classicalliberalarts.com

Timaeus, by Plato

Here we present the text of Plato’s dialogue the Timaeus (ti-MAY-us), translated by Thomas Taylor. One of Plato’s most influential dialogues, the Timaeus is the source of the famous story of the lost city of Atlantis, the nature of the world, the arrangement of the heavens, and more. To study the works of Plato in the Academy, please visit the Academy Study Center. Return to the Works of Plato Return to the Works of Plato

Alcibiades I, by Plato

Works of Plato, Alcibiades I

Here we present the text of Plato’s dialogues Alcibiades I, or First Alcibiades, translated by Thomas Taylor. In this dialogue, Alcibiades I, Socrates investigates the nature of man, and explains the meaning of the famous ancient command: “Know thyself.” Read the dialogue and be amazed at how accurately the ancient philosophers understood the nature of man–a creature composed of body and soul, made to the image and likeness of God. To study the works of Plato in the Academy, please visit the Academy Study Center. Return to the Works of Plato Return to the Works of Plato

St. Thomas Aquinas on the Duty of a Wise Man

St. Thomas Aquinas

“My mouth shall meditate truth, and my lips shall hate impiety” Proverbs 8:7 The language of common people, which according to Aristotle, is to be followed in giving names to things, has commonly held that they are to be called “wise” who order things rightly and govern them well. Hence, among other things that men have conceived about the wise man, Aristotle includes the notion that “it belongs to the wise man to order.” Now, the rule of government and order for all things directed to an end must be taken from the end. For, since the end of each … Continue