THL-421 Summa Contra Gentiles, Book I, Chapter 1.

In this lesson, we begin the study of the “Summa Contra Gentiles” by St. Thomas Aquinas. To complete the objectives of this lesson, complete the following tasks: Study the lesson for mastery. Complete the lesson assessment. Lesson translated by Anton C. Pegis “My mouth shall meditate truth, and my lips shall hate impiety” Proverbs 8:7 1. The usage of the multitude, which according to the Philosopher is to be followed in giving names to things, has commonly held that they are to be called wise who order things rightly and govern them well. Hence, among other things that men have … Continue

Summa Theologica Part I, Question 14. The Knowledge of God

Study the Summa Theologica in the Classical Liberal Arts Academy

Having considered what belongs to the divine substance, we have now to treat of God’s operation. And since one kind of operation is immanent, and another kind of operation proceeds to the exterior effect, we treat first of knowledge and of will (for understanding abides in the intelligent agent, and will is in the one who wills); and afterwards of the power of God, the principle of the divine operation as proceeding to the exterior effect. Now because to understand is a kind of life, after treating of the divine knowledge, we consider the divine life. And as knowledge concerns … Continue

Summa Theologica Part I, Question 13. The Names of God

Study the Summa Theologica in the Classical Liberal Arts Academy

After the consideration of those things which belong to the divine knowledge, we now proceed to the consideration of the divine names. For everything is named by us according to our knowledge of it. Under this head, there are twelve points for inquiry: Article 1. Whether a Name Can Be Given to God? Objection 1: It seems that no name can be given to God. For Dionysius says (Div. Nom. i) that, “Of Him there is neither name, nor can one be found of Him;” and it is written: “What is His name, and what is the name of His … Continue

St. Thomas Aquinas on the Office of a Wise Man

St. Thomas Aquinas

In the Classical Liberal Arts Academy, we study to become wise men. In this post, I’d like to share a passage from St. Thomas Aquinas’ famous work, “Summa Contra Gentiles”, in which he discusses the office, or duty, of a wise man. Enjoy. -WCM “My mouth shall meditate truth, and my lips shall hate impiety.” Proverbs 8:7 1. The usage of the multitude, which according to the Philosopher is to be followed in giving names to things, has commonly held that they are to be called wise who order things rightly and govern them well. Hence, among other things that … Continue