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Academy College Prep Curriculum

© William C. Michael, 2021

The best colleges and universities, as well as religious communities and all businesses, are seeking students who aim higher in their high school studies, seeking out the most rigorous studies available to them.    The world is filled with resources and opportunities that no young men or women are qualified to make use of.  While every program today, from public high schools to Catholic homeschool programs, offers the same minimal K-12 curriculum, only the Classical Liberal Arts Academy provides students with an elite high school study program that separates them from their peers and introduces them to the wisdom they need to live intelligently and virtuously in the modern world.

Setting Goals

The normal high school calendar provides for 40 minutes per subject for 180 days per year, for a total of 120 hours of time with an instructor for each subject.  It is necessary for students aiming for admission to selective colleges to study for more than 36 weeks each year.  It is recommended that students study for 48 weeks per year for maximum achievement.  Homeschool parents can award students 1 high school credit per subject once 180 days of study are completed.  If students complete 48 weeks, the can be awarded with 1.25 credits per course, significantly increasing the student’s high school credit total.  For more information on managing high school studies, please contact us.

Private Tutoring

It is unlikely that homeschool students will be able to manage this plan of studies without the assistance of a skilled private tutor.  Mr. William C. Michael, the headmaster of the Classical Liberal Arts Academy, will be teaching this entire curriculum on video beginning in the summer 2021.  To discuss tutoring options, please contact us.

Freshman Studies

I.  English

  • Classical Grammar
  • English Composition
  • English Literaure I

II.  Latin

  • Latin Reading
  • Latin Grammar

III.  Mathematics

  • Algebra I
  • Plane & Solid Geometry

IV.  Natural Science

  • Aristotle, On the Heavens
  • Ptolemy, Almagest
  • Copernicus, On the Revolutions
  • Galileo, Dialogue

V. History

  • Ancient History

VI. Philosophy

  • Classical Reasoning I
  • Classical Ethics

VII.  Theology

  • Sacred Scripture
  • Summa Theologica I

Sophomore Studies

I.  English

  • Classical Grammar
  • English Composition
  • English Literaure II

II.  Latin

  • Latin Reading
  • Latin Grammar

III.  Mathematics

  • Algebra II
  • Analytical Geometry

IV.  Natural Science (Biology)

  • Aristotle, On the Heavens
  • Aristotle, History of Animals
  • Theophrastus, History of Plants
  • Linnaeus, System of Nature
  • Darwin, Origin of Species

V. History

  • Classical History

VI. Philosophy

  • Classical Reasoning II
  • Plato, Republic

VII.  Theology

  • Sacred Scripture III
  • Summa Theologica II

Junior Studies

I.  English

  • Classical Grammar
  • English Composition
  • English Literaure III

II.  Latin

  • Latin Reading
  • Latin Grammar

III.  Mathematics

  • Geometry & Trigonometry

IV.  Natural Science (1700s)

  • Aristotle, Physics
  • Newton, The Mathematical Principles of Natural Phliosophy
  • Einstein, The Evolution of Physics

V. History

  • Medieval History

VI. Philosophy

  • Classical Reasoning IV
  • Classical Ethics
  • Plato, Timaeus

VII.  Theology

  • Sacred Scripture V
  • Summa Theologica III

Senior Studies

I.  English

  • Classical Grammar
  • English Composition
  • English Literaure IV

II.  Latin

  • Latin Reading
  • Latin Grammar

III.  Mathematics

  • Calculus

IV.  Natural Science (1800s-1900s)

  • Plato, Timaeus (360 BC)
  • Epicurus, Letters (270 BC)
  • Lucretius, On the Nature of Things (55 BC)
  • Bacon, New Organon (1620)
  • Boyle, Skeptical Chemist (1661)
  • Hooke, Micrographia (1665)
  • Lavoisier, Elements of Chemistry
  • Dalton, New System of Chemistry

V. History

  • Modern History

VI. Philosophy

  • Classical Reasoning V
  • Classical Metaphysics

VII.  Theology

  • Sacred Scripture VI
  • Summa Theologica IV

Avoid Modern Errors

The desire to turn education into a massive, bureaucratized institution, or a money-making system, leads all into an excessive interest in documentation, assessments and record-keeping with little or no progress in advanced studies.  Most students make little to no progress because so much time, energy and resources are wasted on the production and management of meaningless school data.  In the Classical Liberal Arts Academy, the true assessment of a student’s progress is his ability to continue into more challenging studies over time.   We minimize artificial assessments and advise parents to avoid excessive interest in data and records, while focusing on helping the students continue onward and updward in the curriculum.

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